How it works

Our Founder, Krista Shoe, has worked for Caribbean Coral Restoration since 2017. The skills and methods that she learned with this elite organization are what will be used in Mother of Corals projects. Once local permits are secured, projects will follow the below steps.

Our projects focus on training local community members to build artificial structures that create permanent fish habitats. Using these key steps, we help communities implement new reef systems across the globe.

STEP 1

Collect & fragment corals

Using broken corals collected from local reef sites*, we fragment and attach smaller samples to “coral trees”. Some corals prefer different substrates, so coral trees structures vary by design.
*We never collect samples from healthy, intact corals.

STEP 2

Monitor and clean coral trees

Fragmented corals are cleaned and monitored for adaptation and growth. As corals grow, they are either re-fragmented and added to the tree or outplanted to an artificial reef structure.

STEP 2.5

Build & place artificial reef structures

While corals adjust to their temporary homes, we work on a more permanent solution: cement structures. Once finished, they are lowered to the site to act as the base for the artificial reef system.

STEP 3

Outplant corals onto structures

Once the cement structures are in place, we bring it all together. Sizable coral fragments are attached to the structures and closely monitored to ensure they adapt to their new home.

Current Projects

La Carolina, Bocas Del Toro, Panama

In collaboration with Caribbean Coral Restoration

We are currently populating an existing reef that is struggling with outplants of acropora (elkhorn and staghorn) and millepora (fire coral). We are also building an aritifical reef about 45 feet off of the natural reef where we will outplant the same species. This will help populate the natural reef when the corals spawn in August.

Solarte, Bocas Del Toro, Panama

In collaboration with Caribbean Coral Restoration

We have built three artificial reefs on the north side of Solarte Island, in collaboration with Caribbean Coral Restoration. The three reefs form a large triangle serving as migration points for fish of all kinds.

Pargo Point, Bocas Del Toro, Panama

In collaboration with Caribbean Coral Restoration

Pargo Point Community Build was a collaboration between Floating Doctors, Caribbean Coral Restoration, and the indigenous community of Valle Escondido. The project’s goal is to teach a fishing village how to create artificial structures. We put the structures in the ocean near their village where they can watch the fish populations return.

Ready to build an artificial reef?